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New curbing near Dollar General hinders truck traffic

New curbing along a driveway that Dollar General and Southern Tire share on Main Street in Trenton.

New curbing along a driveway that Dollar General and Southern Tire share on Main Street in Trenton.

A downtown Trenton business owner wants answers from the Department of Transportation after re-curbing along Main Street has negatively affected his business.

Doug Crawford, owner of Southern Tire, said he was surprised to find that the access he shares with the Dollar General store being built on Main Street, was re-curbed on Veteran’s Day, closing off a key access to his property.

Large semi trucks that had always turned off Main Street and into Southern Tire are no longer able to do so because of the new curb, instead they have to go down Lancaster Street and across the old railroad bed to access the tire store, Crawford explained.

“I showed up one morning and there it was, there was no communication with DOT or anyone,” Crawford said. “There was no mention on the site plan that the access was going to be curbed.”

Not only has the new curb affected truck traffic in and out of Southern Tire, but it has also closed off Crawford’s direct access to the two lots he owns behind his store and therefore may hinder future development on those lots.

Crawford pointed out that according to the City of Trenton’s plat, the access has actually been a designated street since 1905. Jefferson Street, as the unpaved road is formally known, was never closed by the City.

It’s true, Crawford said, having a Dollar General built on a vacant lot next to his property does make his land more valuable, but he would like for the Department of Transportation to put the access back in.

In a meeting with Department of Transportation officials and City Manager Taylor Brown last week, Crawford was told that the Department of Transportation was wrong in not contacting the neighboring property owner, especially since the two parties share the driveway access. DOT officials verbally committed to correct the situation and cover the cost involved.

“It’s easy to see how it happened, it was a human mistake,” said Trenton City Manager Taylor Brown. “I hope they will work in earnest to fix the problem.”

By Carrie A. Mizell